Raiders thread

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Harryo the K

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yup, with that financial structure it pretty much prices out 90-99% of former fans , it's what happened with the Niners and the old Candlestick faithful. Sad.
You think anyone of these Raider fans will be in the $3,900 section? And folks that are there, the gambler from Indiana, probably ain't going to be looking like this. Ps. I bet they renamed the Black Hole.

CB56DC15-346B-4486-90ED-1D1BDA265146.jpeg
 

wrbanwal

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"betting" the psl won't be a problem and the hooligans above will buy single games from a broker
 

Gill Man

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AB suffered frostbite during cryotherapy:

Unreal.....dude is the franchise WR and is wearing the wrong shoes during cryotherapy causing frostbite. Apparently the treatment was in France. WTF is that? And where is the Raider medical team making sure this guy isn't effing things up with his treatments? On second thought, maybe that's what happend to Mark Davis' hair so he endorses it.
 

Harryo the K

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"betting" the psl won't be a problem and the hooligans above will buy single games from a broker

They'll sell because it Vegas. But not to the hard core Raider fans. That $3900 is tied up in bail money from whopping on some Chugger fan.
 

Fender57

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Sep 7, 2008
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AB suffered frostbite during cryotherapy:

Unreal.....dude is the franchise WR and is wearing the wrong shoes during cryotherapy causing frostbite. Apparently the treatment was in France. WTF is that? And where is the Raider medical team making sure this guy isn't effing things up with his treatments? On second thought, maybe that's what happend to Mark Davis' hair so he endorses it.
Man, hope it doesn’t result in amputation.
 

Concudan

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Deeeeamn.... This guys is a friggin Diva from hell...

Sources: AB files helmet grievance against NFL

Oakland Raiders wide receiver Antonio Brown has filed a grievance against the NFL to be allowed to wear the helmet he prefers, not the one the league mandates, league sources told ESPN on Friday.

Brown is expected to have a hearing that will occur as early as next week, and an arbitrator will decide whether or not he gets to wear the helmet he wants.

New NFL rules being enforced this season say he can't. The helmet that Brown is comfortable in and has worn throughout his career with the Pittsburgh Steelers is no longer certified by NOCSAE -- the National Operating Committee for Standards and Athletic Equipment.

The NFL has a policy of not allowing players to wear helmets that are not certified by NOCSAE. NOCSAE's rule has been that no helmets older than 10 years can be worn.

Brown is expected to have a hearing as early as next week, and the arbitrator will decide whether or not he gets to wear the helmet he wants. New NFL rules in effect this season say he can't.

It's the latest complication in what has become a complicated summer for Brown, from his head to his feet. He suffered extreme frostbite on his feet as a result of not wearing appropriate footwear when he entered a cryotherapy chamber last month in France, a source told ESPN.

The foot injury has limited his practice time this summer, and he has not been in camp recently as he meets with specialists. Other league sources, however, have wondered how much his absence stems from the helmet issue, which has been an ongoing battle since the start of training camp.

The NFL and NFLPA want players to wear helmets designed in the most effective manner to safeguard against potential head injuries.

The Raiders are "aware and supportive of Antonio Brown, but [have] no further comment."

During the offseason, the NFL and NFLPA added 11 helmets to their joint list of approved equipment for this season while eliminating a grace period for other models that have fallen short in laboratory testing. By the end of last season, the NFL said 32 players were wearing helmets that now are banned. Brown was one, and Patriots quarterback Tom Brady -- who has openly complained about the rule -- was the other.

Though the league and NFLPA has tested helmets since 2018, last year was the first time it banned certain models. This season, the league is enforcing the rule and trying to make no exceptions, even saying that any player wearing a banned helmet will be subject to discipline.
 

Harryo the K

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I'm not against this at all. The NFL is one huge corporation of idiots like Spanos, Ross, and Jones. They should outlaw Deano's goofy sunglasses and Mark Davis' haircut. At least AB is entertaining and halfway works for his money.
 
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Harryo the K

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6A638E49-75D0-4B12-9E9D-D86338B27367.jpeg



Helmets?


Get real. The great ones wore leather.

Tom Harmon, Michigan.......The SDRay Four Horsemen of Notre Dame.
 
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SDRay

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Q&A: Mark Davis on Cliff Branch, getting his ‘ass kicked’ in L.A. and Oakland’s ‘real pricks’


NAPA, Calif. — Raiders owner Mark Davis tucked himself into a corner booth at the lobby bar of the Napa Valley Marriott Hotel and Spa, shortly after his team’s joint practice with the Rams. To his left was Raiders legend George Atkinson, a Davis friend and confidant for more than 25 years.
“My father,” Davis said, nodding proudly at Atkinson as he settled in to talk about the Raiders.
These are interesting times for Davis and the Silver and Black, who are simultaneously bidding a final farewell to Oakland, their on-and-off home for almost 60 years, while also anticipating the exciting new future that awaits them in Las Vegas. There, a $1.8 billion state-of-the-art stadium is emerging just off the Las Vegas Strip. The new digs and the long-term security they represent will put the Raiders on a better financial path to compete with the rest of the NFL as well as transform Las Vegas and Nevada.
For all those reasons, Davis is eager to get settled in his new home. But he remains cognizant of the market he’s vacating and the fans he’s leaving behind. And that has created an emotional balancing act.
For Davis, saying a proper and respectful goodbye is every bit as important as the hello he’ll soon make in Las Vegas.
“I’m excited about Las Vegas. I’m excited about our future. There’s no doubt about that,” he said. “But I’ve also been aware of Oakland and not wanting to rub it in their face or anything else. So we’re not able to celebrate everything, entirely, out of respect.”
So while Davis keeps one eye on the Raiders’ preparation for their final season in Oakland, he also is focused on Southern Nevada. As one chapter of Raiders history comes to a close, a new one springs to life.
“It’s a very busy time,” Davis said. “I feel like a rubber band, living in two different worlds with Oakland and Las Vegas. But I haven’t snapped.”
Just then, a woman nervously approached Davis, holding a phone.
“I am so sorry, but I have someone who really wants to say hi to you,” she said.
“Sure, why not,” Davis said taking the phone.
“Um … who am I talking to?” he asks her, a bit awkwardly.
“Roger Craig,” she responds.
The thought of talking to the former San Francisco 49ers great prompted a big smile from Davis. The passage of time has frayed the memory, but Craig actually played for the Raiders at one point. It was only one season, but as Davis likes to say, once a Raider always a Raider
“Hey man, how are you doing, Roger?” Davis asks.
Almost immediately, the conversation turned to the shocking death of former Raiders great Cliff Branch, who Davis considers a brother and who he once represented as an agent.
Branch died in his sleep last weekend at 71. The news hit particularly hard for Davis, who essentially grew up with Branch. In fact, they once shared a house together.
“Well, I was a lot better before this weekend,” Davis told Craig, his voice cracking, “But I’m doing OK. He was 71. He went to bed and didn’t wake up. It’s terrible. Thank you. Thank you. I’ll do that man. It’s all about family, baby, and you’re a part of our family. Love you, man.”
“I’m still in shock,” Davis said after finishing up with Craig. “I’m using the word ‘compartmentalize.’ We’ve lost a lot of Raiders the last year or so. It doesn’t seem fair, but as we age it’s obviously going to happen even more. And I think for us, being involved … for us it’s family all the way through.
“It hurts to lose my best friend, and Cliff still is my best friend,” he continued. “We spent 47 years together. He was one of the greatest people you’ll ever know. He did everything for everyone else. And he’d share anything with you. He was a unique individual, and I’d say, for the last 25 years, he put his life in order and there’s nothing bad you can say about it. Like I said … I’m in shock.”
With that, Davis settled in for an exclusive interview with The Athletic. The conversation has been lightly edited.
It’s been a year now, working with Jon Gruden. How would you describe how it’s going thus far?
I recruited him for six years. I spent a lot of time on American Airlines going through Dallas to get to Tampa. I saw somebody that works as hard and studies as hard as my father. So I knew the work ethic would always be there. So as long as that’s there — and I know he loves this organization as much as anybody, and he really does. He loves the history And he embraces it. And he teaches it. I can only believe he’ll be successful. And there’s no pressure. There’s no pressure with him at all.
I think (former general manager) Reggie (McKenzie) did a good job of keeping this organization afloat and putting us in position that a guy like Jon felt comfortable enough to come in and take a chance with it. But I think he and Reggie (were working) on different speeds. And I think bringing Mike Mayock in is really going to help him because they think on the same speed.
From your vantage point, how is the working relationship between Jon Gruden and Mike Mayock?
It seems to be working pretty damn well. They both have similar philosophies. They both work their fucking asses off. I used to tease Mike when I’d see him over the years, and I would talk to him about coming to work for the organization because his work ethic and his even-keel approach to player evaluation was something that always impressed me. And you see those qualities here.
You and Gruden made some big moves last year — controversial moves by trading Khalil Mack and Amari Cooper. I think now, seeing the draft capital and salary-cap space you got in return and how those resources are being utilized, there was a plan in place that maybe some people weren’t seeing at the time. Is that accurate?
It is, and I think (for) Jon, watching it from afar, from the TV booth, it was so totally different than getting in the locker room with these guys and the practice field with these guys and actually seeing what he’s got. When you’re watching from upstairs you’re not seeing the mental side of the game. You’re not seeing how guys practice. You’re not seeing a lot of the things that go on with players as a coach versus watching from afar. So I think he got here and, by seeing the players for real, I think he realized that his first impression (of what he had to work with) was maybe a little different compared to what he actually did have. So I think he realized he was going to have to do a lot of work at a lot of different positions because there just weren’t the players there for the style of team he wanted to build.
There was a nucleus, but at the same time, was that nucleus something that he was going to build a team with, based on the overweight of the contracts and things of that nature?

Jon Gruden returned to coach the Raiders after accepting Mark Davis ‘ 10-year, $100 million offer. (Kirby Lee / USA Today)
Is it safe to say the thought was you’d be in a better position moving forward by collecting assets and creating salary-cap space to devote to multiple needs, rather than tying so much of it up in one player?
And (Jon) never got to talk to the one guy. His agent wouldn’t let him talk to him. He talked to him for 30 seconds after getting hired, and then the agent took over. And here’s the thing: I love Khalil Mack, I really do. But he was in his fourth year and then he was going to have his fifth-year option and he was going to (possibly hold out and) pull a Le’Veon Bell.
Now I didn’t know whether he was or wasn’t, but I started hearing (it) from his teammates that know him and know me. And I wasn’t going to do that, and Jon couldn’t do that. Are we going to let him sit out and go through Jon’s first year with that situation hanging over his head? It just wasn’t fair to Jon and it wasn’t fair to anyone else. But did Jon say, “You gotta get rid of this guy?” Hell no. But (had he signed) what would we have along with it? We’d have Derek (Carr) and Khalil and …”
You’ve been in camp two weeks or so, and you have a game coming up against the Rams on Saturday. Any early impressions of the team this year?
Right now, we’re undefeated. We’ll see. I think we had a pretty good draft. I think all three of those first-round picks are going to be able to play football. We picked up some free agents I believe are going to help this team. And bringing in (Richie) Incognito — you know, I like him as a person. I know, whatever, sometimes things happen. You know, we had Barret Robbins, who was bipolar. And with medication, it could be controlled. And I think Richie, I don’t know what his situation is exactly, but just meeting him, he’s the coolest dude you’ll ever meet. And what a beast on the field.
Any update on Antonio Brown’s foot situation?
You’d have to ask someone else about that. I’m a “MD,” but I’m not a foot doctor. But I’ll say this, just watching him (when he did) practice, nobody works harder than this guy. And I’ve seen some of the best, Cliff and everyone else. Antonio doesn’t have the straight-line speed that Cliff had, but he might have more football speed. And the way he can control it and everything.
Obviously, Los Angeles is a big part of your history. Any thoughts on how it’s working with the Rams and Chargers there?
I don’t know how it’s going to work. I honestly don’t know how it’s going to work (between the Rams and Chargers). But I absolutely think Hollywood Park is the absolute best spot in Los Angeles for it to be. That’s where I would have preferred to build a stadium if I was going to build a stadium. It’s where my dad preferred to build a stadium. I think the wherewithal of (Rams owner Stan) Kroenke is really a key attribute to making it work. To actually take 300 acres of, really, a big great flat piece of land and turn it into something special, well, it’s not a bad deal.
Do you ever look back on the Los Angeles situation a few years ago, and if so what do you take away from how all that played out?
For me, that whole thing, and as I said afterward, the good thing is it was a three-team race. The bad news is, we came in third. But I realized by the way that whole thing ended, with the Chargers having the first opportunity to take the Los Angeles market if they wanted it, and if they didn’t that the Raiders had the next chance to do it, that (the NFL) had actually voted for us to leave Oakland. By telling us we could potentially take the Los Angeles opportunity at some point, they were also saying the Oakland market had failed as a market for the NFL.
Now, when that was over (the NFL) gave each of us another $100 million (in stadium money) and I came back to Oakland and I said, now listen, we have $300 million from the Raiders, $300 million from the league, that’s $600 million dollars. Now I need help, I can’t do it on my own. I need help. And we couldn’t get the help. And we came back to Oakland and in good faith negotiated an extension (at the Coliseum) and we had a press conference, and in the press conference it was a “kumbaya” moment. And I had my tail between my legs. But I said, listen, we can still work on a long-term extension here. We were still trying to work something out for a stadium. This is where I want to be. But I need help.
So we had a press conference explaining that and everything else, and about a week later, one of the county board of supervisors told me, “Mark, you’re not going to believe what I’m about to tell you. And you’re not going to be happy about it, but they’re not going to honor what they negotiated with (Raiders president Marc) Badain and they’re going to raise the rent higher.” And at that point, I said, “Fuck this.” I mean, OK, I talked to Badain and we decided to sign the extension, but at that point we were now going to take the opportunity at other options.
Does it frustrate you that people don’t really understand how it all went down, how serious you worked to make it happen in Oakland and what you were willing to do as a partner?
They may never truly understand, but that’s OK because I know in my heart that’s what happened.
Are you following the A’s stadium situation?
No, not at all. Unfortunately, there’s a problem there. As far as the players and everybody, we love the A’s. We seriously do. But the front office has been real pricks. They’ve been really fucking around with us up there, taking advantage of the situation. Which, it is their right to do it, but it makes it hard. Again though, we love the players, we love the A’s.
And now it looks like there might be an issue on the Oakland city end about selling the Coliseum land to the A’s while the county is on board with that deal?
They’re fucking totally dysfunctional. It’s that fucking bad over there.
On the other hand, while it’s never as easy at it might appear from the outside, it just seems like the partnership between the Raiders and Nevada has been working unbelievably well.
Magnificent. I’ve never seen a public/private partnership work so smoothly. People keeping their word, the political process. And I have to say it would have never got done without the help of Sheldon Adelson. It just wouldn’t. He shepherded the deal. He brought all the right people to the table. He made it happen. Me not knowing the politics and going into another state … he really helped get it done. But also Marc Badain rose to heights that are unimaginable. It’s unbelievable what he did, what he pulled off, as a young kid who grew up in this organization. And to take it to the level he has, it’s unbelievable.
Was there ever a concern on your part when Adelson moved out of the deal?
I don’t know about concerned, but you know, everything to me is relatable to a football game or sports to where, hey, a play goes bad or there’s a turnover, you have to come right back and continue to play the game. And that’s exactly what we did. We knew how the legislature was written, we knew how everything was written and we knew there was a spot for us. And if in fact we had the financing, we’d be in a position to do it. And I made a commitment to the governor. And once I made that commitment, that is where my allegiance lay. I wanted it to work with Sheldon in it, and like I said, he really got it done. It wouldn’t have happened without him. But at a certain stage, our purposes didn’t fully mix.
Obviously, the Raiders will always have a strong presence in Los Angeles, but given how things worked out in Las Vegas is there a sense that the way the L.A. situation played out, maybe it was for the best for the Raiders?
Yes, I do. And let me say this: On that L.A. deal, I got my ass kicked. I got my fucking ass kicked, all right? And as I was on the ground I said, “OK, I have to get up and wipe myself off and move forward.”
What did you learn from that experience?
Nothing that I didn’t already know, to be honest. It just reinforced the situation.
You just announced a naming-rights deal with the Las Vegas stadium, which will be called Allegiant Stadium. That’s a pretty big deal to take care of.
The naming rights and topping out (on Monday) was a huge milestone. And we’ve hit milestone moments along the way. But I’ve been using this line: The least important thing is the score at halftime. And we still have a job to finish and I keep reminding the workers of that. Yes, this is a milestone but let’s get this thing finished, safely. And until we’re done, we’re not celebrating. When the ribbon cutting happens, I’ll celebrate. But as far as our offices up in Henderson, we know that our players, or most of them, will be living in that area. The stadium, the topping-out happened the other day, the steel issues and all of that stuff is all done. Now we’ll move on to closing it all out, the interior, got to get the roof pulled up.
But it’s exciting as hell. We’re working with the community, really, a lot. And for me I’ve looked at the Aces, the women’s basketball team that we go to a lot of games to watch, and the (Golden) Knights of the NHL as our brothers and sisters in bringing pro sports to Las Vegas. And we’re all working together. We’re not competing with each other. So it’s fun to open up a new market like that. It’s truly exciting from that aspect. The potential of Las Vegas, as a game-day experience, will be like the Super Bowl every Sunday. There’s just a buy-in from everybody. So that’s exciting.

Mark Davis said he has found support in Las Vegas. (Stephen R. Sylvanie / USA Today)
How are ticket sales going?
Fantastic. Insane. You know, you didn’t really know because people were talking about it being a small market. It’s the 40th-biggest television market, it’s this and it’s that. But goddamn it, there’s 43 million people that fly into that city every year. And it’s a drive from Los Angeles that people in Southern California are used to making. So that Sunday-night drive out of Las Vegas will be pretty interesting.
As you look ahead to your future, how high can the Raiders take it in Las Vegas?
The sky is the limit. And it’s (about) how well we’ll be able to take advantage of all the opportunities in front of us. And whether we have the infrastructure within our own organization and whether we have the vision to follow through on that vision. I believe the vision is there, but I can’t do all the follow through. I have to have the right people, and Marc Badain has been doing a tremendous job getting all the right people in the right spots. It’s incredibly exciting.
You have one more year in Oakland. How has the transition gone in closing the chapter up there?
I think it’s played out phenomenally. We haven’t won — that’s the part that hasn’t played out well. I would have loved to have won a championship for Oakland, and we still may. We still have this season. We have the greatest fans in the world there, and all throughout the nation but Oakland in particular.
We’re just going to do the best we can to win. That’s what we’re trying to do. That’s why I brought in Jon. Everything I do is geared toward winning. And making those people proud of being Raiders. They’ve stuck with us through thick and thin. And we want to do right by them.
 

Harryo the K

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Does it frustrate you that people don’t really understand how it all went down, how serious you worked to make it happen in Oakland and what you were willing to do as a partner?
They may never truly understand, but that’s OK because I know in my heart that’s what happened.

Spanni...Davis.....same crap. Never changes. Go to Vegas. Enjoy yourself.
 

Concudan

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NFL responds to Antonio Brown's reported helmet-related legal threat: WR would potentially be in 'breach of contract'

t took less than a day for the NFL to respond to Antonio Brown's apparent plan to get the league to allow him to continue using a helmet that is no longer an approved model by the league. The NFL's response, issued by spokesman Brian McCarthy, essentially boils down to: "That's not how this is gonna go."

"The player can't practice or play in games with equipment that's not approved," McCarthy said, clearly referencing Brown even if not specifying him by name. "If he doesn't play or practice he is in breach of his contract and doesn't get paid. NFL policy is that Helmets have to be certified by NOSCAE. They don't certify equipment that's old(er) than 10 years."


Over the weekend, it was reported by The Athletic that during his grievance hearingregarding the now un-approved helmet, Brown's legal team told the league that if Brown "suffered a head injury in a helmet that he is compelled to wear, he would hold the league liable."

As our John Breech wrote this weekend, "Brown's situation is unique compared to other players who wore an illegal helmet last year and that's because his helmet never failed any sort of safety test. Although 11 different helmets have been banned by the league for failing the safety test -- including the model that Tom Brady used to wear -- Brown's helmet is only banned because it hasn't been certified by the National Operating Committee for Standards and Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) and the NFL doesn't allow players to use any uncertified helmets."

CBS Sports NFL Insider Jason La Canfora pointed out on Friday that NOCSAE does not certify helmets over 10 years old, which is why Brown's 12-year-old Schutt Air Advantage helmet -- which the company discontinued making in 2011 -- is now illegal. Raiders coach Jon Gruden has indicated that the organization is supporting Brown in his quest to be allowed to wear his usual helmet, and that he expects Brown to contribute to the team for a long time. If the expected situation occurs and Brown is not allowed to wear that helmet, we'll soon find out if he will go through with his threat to retire from football.
 

Concudan

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I see a bunch of people saying that AB should be allowed to play in what ever helmet he wants (Twittsville, Faceborg, etc...).

Some of those people are the same ones who are pissing and moaning that the NFL is not doing enough to prevent head injuries and brain damage.

So which is it? Let players do what ever the hell they want, dance the diva dance so to speak, or the NFL do what is needed to protect the divas? Make up your damn minds!
 

SDRay

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Jon Gruden: Antonio Brown will play Week One


The status of Raiders wide receiver Antonio Brown has been the biggest question of the NFL preseason, with Brown missing time both because he injured his feet in a cryotherapy session gone wrong, and because he was fighting the league to get permission to wear his preferred helmet. But Raiders coach Jon Gruden says there’s no question about Brown’s status for the start of the season.

Asked today if Brown will play Week One, Gruden answered, “Oh yeah. Yep.”


For his part, Brown told reporters he’s not sure when his feet will be healthy enough for him to practice. But he sounded an optimistic note about his ability to return.


Brown has been one of the best wide receivers in the NFL over the last several years, a point that can sometimes be forgotten amid all the off-field nonsense that surrounds him. Perhaps he can remind everyone of what kind of player he is when the Raiders open the season on Monday, September 9 against the Broncos.
 

SDRay

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AB finds newer model of helmet, returns to camp

NAPA, Calif. -- Antonio Brown returned to Oakland Raiders training camp for the first time in two weeks on Tuesday, with a compromise on his helmet issue seemingly in sight and his frostbitten feet continuing to heal.

The four-time All-Pro receiver came out to the field at 11:05 a.m. PT, about 15 minutes before practice ended.

"I'm extremely grateful to be here," Brown said. "Been dealing with a lot of adversity. I'm excited to be back, see my teammates, and get in the groove of things."

Good to have you back, 84. pic.twitter.com/N9u1mHG1P8
— Oakland Raiders (@Raiders) August 13, 2019
Brown and his agent, Drew Rosenhaus, acknowledged the helmet issue has been weighing on the player. He accepted Monday's decision by an independent arbitrator that went against him using his 10-year-old Schutt Air Advantage helmet, but now he's looking at a possible resolution that can result in him wearing the same model, just more recently produced.

Earlier Tuesday, Brown put out a post on social media asking fans for their help in finding a version of his old helmet that has been manufactured since 2010.

"I'm looking for a Schutt Air Advantage Adult Large Helmet that was manufactured in 2010 or after. In exchange I will trade a signed practice worn @Raiders helmet."
— AB (@AB84) August 13, 2019
Rosenhaus said they had located some and that it was just a matter of getting one of those reconditioned and re-certified.

"So, it's all reasonable," Rosenhaus said. "I mean, it's all very plausible.

"Understand that this is a guy that's worn this helmet for nine years. He's taken a million hits and he's been healthy and one of the most durable players ever at his position. So you can understand why he'd want to continue to wear that helmet. It's very important to him. It's a big part of his safety. ... The Schutt Air Advantage is what he's worn his whole life."

If Brown can get a model that's been manufactured since 2010 certified by the National Athletic Equipment Reconditioners Association (NAERA), it is not clear whether the NFL would sign off on it, because the technology is outdated.

Schutt discontinued the Air Advantage in 2009, according to Glenn Beckmann, Schutt's director of marketing communications. But the company continued to manufacture the model for a short period afterward to ensure a supply of parts for reconditioning and warranty claims.

Beckmann said he "can't imagine" any Air Advantage models were manufactured after 2011, and the company does not have any in stock. Helmets are registered with an eight-character number stamped inside the product, similar to a VIN number for automobiles, that confirm its manufacture date.

"There was nothing wrong with the Air Advantage," Beckmann said. "It had just outlived its life."

Brown has tried out the new certified helmet and believes it protrudes and interferes with his vision as he tries to catch the football. He also argued that his helmet made him feel safe.

Rosenhaus reiterated that his client, who was acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers in March and promptly given a three-year, $50.125 million contract, had been working on the helmet issue for "months."

Brown had reportedly threatened to retire if he was not allowed to wear his helmet.

"All the talk about retirement and everything else, that's not a consideration right now," Rosenhaus said. "He's committed to the team, he's committed to the season, and everyone can take solace in that. He'll be playing this year and playing for the Raiders."

Rosenhaus also said that Brown's absence from the Raiders had everything to do with the extreme frostbite on his feet he suffered in a July cryotherapy mishap in France.

"It wasn't his intention to leave the team for the period of time that he did; he's always had a good line of communication with the club," said Rosenhaus.

The Raiders have held 12 practices, with Brown participating in just one pre-practice walk-through on July 28. He was limited before leaving early on July 30, and he had not been with the team since that day.

"It's a process," Brown said. "We don't make excuses. I'm here today just to get things on the up and up. I'm feeling a lot better. It's been a process through all the adversity, but I'm still here standing, so it's an opportunity for me to do what I desire to do.

"Feel a lot better, you know? Working towards 100 percent. Been a process with the feet. Any time you've got a lot of blisters, it's hard to change directions, cut and run and do what I do naturally."

Brown, who still appeared to be walking gingerly Tuesday, smiled when asked if there was a time frame for him to return to the practice field.

"I guess you've got to stay tuned," he said.

Raiders coach Jon Gruden said he's not sure whether Brown, who was a mainstay during the Raiders' offseason program and put in extra work with quarterback Derek Carr, will play in any of the team's three remaining exhibition games.

Asked, though, if Brown will be ready for the season opener on Sept. 9 against the Denver Broncos on ESPN's "Monday Night Football," Gruden had no doubt.

"Oh yeah," Gruden said. "Yup. We'll work him back in.

"Obviously, it's great to have him back. We've had a pretty good understanding, in spite of what people think. ... We've had a pretty good understanding of the foot injury. We know where he's been. We know what he's been through. We're thrilled to have him back and, obviously, we think he's a great player and we're anxious to get the men together and get rolling."

Count Carr among them.

"Can't wait for him to suit up and be out there with us," Carr said. "... Any time a teammate comes back, it always brings life to the team.

"We'll be ready to go Week 1. We've got a lot of time until then. ... Get some game-plan plays down, some routes, certain cuts he'll run for us. The fact that he's here is a good sign. It's good for us."