FUDEAN draft thread

  • Welcome to America's Finest Sports Forum and Podcast!

    afsportsforum.com is one of the largest online communities covering San Diego sports. We host a regular podcast during the major seasons. You are currently viewing our community forums as a guest user.

    Sign Up or

    Having an account grants you additional privileges, such as creating and participating in discussions. Furthermore, we hide most of the ads once you register as a member!

Harryo the K

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2017
5,113
930
300
69
Still a great article here. Worth the read.

 

Harryo the K

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2017
5,113
930
300
69
It's a hobby. Called can What's the Chuggers Chance for Crash.....


At 15.3 points per game allowed, the Titans defense is allowing the fifth fewest among all defenses this season. They only trail the Patriots (8.0), 49ers (12.8), Bears (13.8), and Bills (14.0).

Now here’s where the Titans separate from the rest: Those teams have a combined record of 18-3, and 4.5 wins per team. The Titans have yet to allow more than 20 points in a single game and they’ve continued to reach the short end of the stick from the offense.
 
Last edited:

Concudan

Still Chargin
Staff member
Administrator
Mar 5, 2006
56,398
3,795
350
Best team in the AFC West? Haha haha... now that’s a hoot!
They are the best team!

How dare you!

HOW DARE YOU SIR!

They are the best at interceptions in the red zone
They are the best at slow starts
They are the best at underachieving
They are the best at making winless teams look goooooooood...

So yeah! What is your team the best at... Hmmmmmmmm?!
 

Harryo the K

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2017
5,113
930
300
69
They are the best team!

How dare you!

HOW DARE YOU SIR!

They are the best at interceptions in the red zone
They are the best at slow starts
They are the best at underachieving
They are the best at making winless teams look goooooooood...

So yeah! What is your team the best at... Hmmmmmmmm?!
Nice job there. Conc-worthy.

6884
 

Gill Man

Inaugural San Diego Charger Fan Since 1962 FUDEAN
Staff member
Moderator
Sep 1, 2017
7,867
1,516
320
It's a hobby. Called can What's the Chuggers Chance for Crash.....


At 15.3 points per game allowed, the Titans defense is allowing the fifth fewest among all defenses this season. They only trail the Patriots (8.0), 49ers (12.8), Bears (13.8), and Bills (14.0).

Now here’s where the Titans separate from the rest: Those teams have a combined record of 18-3, and 4.5 wins per team. The Titans have yet to allow more than 20 points in a single game and they’ve continued to reach the short end of the stick from the offense.
Can the TITans run the ball? If so do it.....they can then control the clock on the chuggers and possibly win. Most teams have done very well against the chuggers running the ball this year.
 

Harryo the K

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2017
5,113
930
300
69
Can the TITans run the ball? If so do it.....they can then control the clock on the chuggers and possibly win. Most teams have done very well against the chuggers running the ball this year.
Slightly better than the Chuggers. Two 2-4 teams. Last decent chance for Chuggers for awhile.


Ps. How's those PSL sales going?

Jan. 21, 2015

Fabiani, special council to Chargers president Dean Spanos and the team’s point person on the stadium issue, wishes the answer was as easy as duplicating San Francisco’s financing plan for Levi’s Stadium. However, he said the Chargers do not have enough local corporate support for that type of financing plan to pencil out in San Diego, according to studies performed by consultants for the Chargers.

Fabiani also noted the San Diego Padres tried to sell PSLs when they opened Petco Park and did not do very well.

“Everyone in San Diego for as long as the Chargers have been here have been used to simply paying for a ticket,” he said. “And to then ask that same person to pay a fee up front in order to have a right to buy a ticket, our consultants who have studied this say there’s very little chance with that approach in San Diego.”

Fabiani pointed to PSL sales for stadiums in Minnesota and Atlanta as being dramatically lower than what the 49ers achieved in Santa Clara. And Fabiani said San Diego’s projected PSL sales would be lower than Minnesota and Atlanta, because those two stadium projects are located in the biggest cities in their respective states.

“San Diego is obviously not either the biggest or the most important city in California,” Fabiani said. “The number of corporate headquarters that exist in San Diego is relatively small. Our support is based on individual fans as opposed to major corporations that are willing to pay a lot of money up front for PSLs or for suites.”
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Gill Man

Harryo the K

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2017
5,113
930
300
69
Article from last year. I agree fully with the ticket vendors grabbing up the low $100 PSLs with intent for years to sell the tickets to visiting team, paying, fans.

 

Fender57

BoltTalker
Sep 7, 2008
4,574
1,111
320
Article from last year. I agree fully with the ticket vendors grabbing up the low $100 PSLs with intent for years to sell the tickets to visiting team, paying, fans.

In the normal scheme of things the NFL wouldn’t allow scalpers to buy up PSLs but I guess they gotta make an exception with the Spanoses if they want to make any money at all from PSLs.
 

Harryo the K

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2017
5,113
930
300
69
Great article. Excellent comments section, read all of them!


Again, I submit this question to the masses, the heavens, any and all of Philip Rivers’s children: Why do the Chargers still exist? No one wants to watch them in person. Anyone who still cares about this team out of some bizarre obligation has only received disappointment in exchange for their time. They could instead root for the Rams, who are slightly less disappointing. If you contracted the Chargers, their good players could go to other teams with better medical staffs. And if the prospect of having an odd number of NFL teams is the only factor holding anyone back from supporting this plan, go ahead and contract the Skins, too.

 
  • Like
Reactions: Quetzalcoatl

Harryo the K

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2017
5,113
930
300
69
Is this the real name of the Charger 'stadium'?

Stadium: ROKiT Field at Dignity Health Sports Park

I don't think you can get 25, 000 drunken Cheeseheads to stagger calmly to the NE Exit.....unless....no, you simply can't do it.

 
  • Haha
Reactions: Gill Man

ThunderHorse17

Lone Wolf
Apr 10, 2010
6,321
347
330
Missouri
Looking for a big game from davante Adams as I'm on a 2 week losing streak and about to drop out of third place in the league. I got killed by injuries both week 7 and 8. Scored my weekly average with both weeks combined, so technically I missed out on 145+ points.

Go PACKERS!

This game is on CBS this afternoon, I think I'll watch what I can tolerate.

Or jus play Borderlands 2. I'm still working on second play through and getting past lvl 50.
 

SDRay

#GoIrish #Aztecs #SDGulls #Raiders #THFC #RipCity
Staff member
Administrator
Podcaster
Jun 20, 2005
13,597
1,943
350
47
Chula Vista, CA
www.afsportsforum.com
LA Chargers’ Chances of Moving Back To San Diego: Slim And None


Confirms that Dean's Measure C was BS and that he had no intention doing a deal in SD.

One Los Angeles Chargers fan threw up his hands and stated the obvious.

"I'm surrounded by cheese!'' he said.

That he was with the Green Bay Packers in town. That meant thousands of their loyal Cheeseheads were in full throat on Sunday as the Chargers beat the Packers, 26-11.

Chargers backers, again, were outnumbered at a home game in a scene that has been repeated since the team returned to L.A.

Something else that's predictable: the national stories about what a disaster the relocation from San Diego to L.A. has been for the Chargers.

Or how the NFL will force the Spanos family to liquidate the team and return to America's Finest City. Or how owner Dean Spanos committed a huge business blunder by leaving his reliable patrons of nearly six decades for the fickle fans of L.A., the ones that arrive late and exit early.

To all those questions, here's the resounding answer from a Chargers executive in-the-know. Any thoughts of the Chargers setting up shop again in their old stomping grounds are all wet.

"We have a better chance of playing in the swimming pool in the backyard at my house than we do in returning to San Diego,'' said Fred Maas, the Chargers' chief of staff who oversees day-to-day business functions for the organization.

Maas once worked for San Diego Centre City Development Corporation which orchestrated the redevelopment of the downtown region. In 2016, he joined the Chargers to spearhead negotiations with the city to strike a deal to keep the squad in San Diego.

He's had a seat at the table when the Chargers were looking at a downtown San Diego site, or one in Mission Valley or any of the other roughly 12 locales in San Diego County. They were the places that all looked spiffy in splashy artist renderings, but weren't worth the paper they were printed on.

"I said back in 2016 that the worst deal in Los Angeles is better than the best deal in San Diego,'' Maas said, not mincing any words. "That statement, that fact, is still true today.''

Sunday was another day in which the Chargers backers were outmatched in the stands, with jerseys of Bart Starr, Aaron Rodgers, Clay Matthews and even Paul Hornung eclipsing the gear that honored Chargers players, past and present.

Maybe that was because tickets were going for about $400 on the secondary market. Chargers season-ticket holders cashed in on the thousands of Packers boosters living in the land of sun balm instead of bratwurst.

The Chargers faithful were heard. But it couldn’t quite match the "Go Pack Go" chant that reverberated around Dignity Health Sports Park, with the colors of yellow and green evident.

But the green that really counts is the potential cash headed to the Chargers in their long-term investment bet by moving. In that regard, Maas said the Chargers have "hit a home run.''

"We went from a market in San Diego with four million people to a market that has 13-15 million people,'' he said. "And of that figure, four million are football fans. So I don't think how many visiting fans are at our games should be a measuring stick.''

Instead the Chargers point to a data base that they've accumulated of nearly 800,000 L.A. area football followers. They mention selling out their season tickets, albeit in a facility which seats about 27,000, in all three of their seasons. They mention the nearly 20,000 people clogging the Santa Monica Pier for last spring's draft party.

Have there been missteps along the way? Maas doesn't discount that. But he couldn't stress any clearer that if San Diego gets another NFL team, while that would be swell, it won't be the Chargers.

"This is not a sprint, it's a marathon,'' Maas said of the Chargers planting their flag in the crowded L.A. sports landscape. "We knew we couldn't parachute into L.A. and have the fans immediately fall in love with you.

"It takes time for them to get to know us, know our players and for us to become familiar faces in the community. I think that is the perspective you have to have.''

So even if the visuals aren't money, the Chargers' decision to flee San Diego is.

"We didn't leave San Diego,'' Maas said. "We got kicked out.''

One Chargers fan is happy they're some 100 miles north.

"I love it that they are here,'' said Burbank's Sean Perez, a Chargers season-ticket holder since 2005. "For an NFL experience, you can't beat this.''

Perez won't bang the drum that the team should be back in San Diego.

"San Diego fans didn't want to pay the money, just like St. Louis fans didn't want to,'' he said. "And if that happens that usually means someone else will.''

And if Perez is elbowed by fans wearing the opposing teams' colors, so be it.

"It's L.A.,'' he said. "Everyone wants to be here and everyone is from somewhere else: Wisconsin, Colorado, just go down the line.''

Perez's buddy from Long Beach couldn't disagree more. Juan Nodal grew up in San Diego and was once a ball boy who ran out of the stadium tunnel with Dan Fouts.

"My preference is that they were still in San Diego because that is where they need to be,'' he said. "I think at some point the NFL is going to force (Spanos) to sell the team and go back.''

They are reports that the Chargers have sold just $100 million in personal seat licenses for season tickets in the new SoFi Stadium. It was once speculated that they would contribute $400 million in sales.

"It's going to be embarrassing for the NFL to have parts of the new stadium tarped off,'' Nodal said.

But Maas wouldn't concede that advance sales aren't up to snuff, while declining to reveal hard numbers of how many season tickets the team has sold for next year.

If nothing else, the Chargers ducats are significantly more affordable than the ones being peddled by the Rams.

So while the Chargers struggle to currently get their fans in the building, their doors will remain open in L.A. They'll move into a $5 billion venue next year with the Rams, which Maas expects to nudge the needle in his team's direction.

"It's going to be enormous,'' he said. "It will be a signature for us and greater Los Angeles. You can't really fathom what it is going be. It's a building the likes of which no one has ever seen.

"People are going to look back five years from now and say Dean was the smartest owner in the NFL to move into this stadium with the favorable economic conditions that give us the running room to do other things.''

It’s believed the Chargers have a 20-year lease at $1 per year, plus four five-year options to extend the agreement.

Those terms are among the factors to prevent the Chargers from skedaddling back to San Diego.

There's also little reason, in their eyes, to be in the nation's No. 28 media market instead of one ranked No. 2, or gallop to a city without a stadium from one where an NFL palace is rising where Hollywood Park once stood.

They’re also obligated to pay a $650 million relocation fee to the other NFL owners and they have borrowed $200 million from the NFL G4 loan program.

The Chargers, whose value increased 11 percent to $2.5 billion in the last year according to Forbes, are also slated to receive a 18.75 percent cut from the reported $30 million annual payment from a 20-year deal for the naming rights sold to Social Finance.

Plus they’re partners in attractive sponsorship deals cemented with American Airlines and Pepsi to lessen the Chargers’ motivation to chuck it all away and come back to San Diego.

Rome wasn't built in a day and the same holds true for accumulating a legion of Chargers fans in L.A.

Still....

"It's clear we made the right decision,'' Maas said. "It might not be moving as fast as we want but we are on track.''

What’s as clear as the Chargers’ stout defense in shutting down Rodgers is that on the team's long road to respectability in the entertainment capital of the world, there's one thought they're not entertaining: returning to San Diego.

"It's not happening by any stretch of the imagination,'' Maas said. "There is no opportunity out there that would make that happen.''
 

Fender57

BoltTalker
Sep 7, 2008
4,574
1,111
320
LA Chargers’ Chances of Moving Back To San Diego: Slim And None


Confirms that Dean's Measure C was BS and that he had no intention doing a deal in SD.

One Los Angeles Chargers fan threw up his hands and stated the obvious.

"I'm surrounded by cheese!'' he said.

That he was with the Green Bay Packers in town. That meant thousands of their loyal Cheeseheads were in full throat on Sunday as the Chargers beat the Packers, 26-11.

Chargers backers, again, were outnumbered at a home game in a scene that has been repeated since the team returned to L.A.

Something else that's predictable: the national stories about what a disaster the relocation from San Diego to L.A. has been for the Chargers.

Or how the NFL will force the Spanos family to liquidate the team and return to America's Finest City. Or how owner Dean Spanos committed a huge business blunder by leaving his reliable patrons of nearly six decades for the fickle fans of L.A., the ones that arrive late and exit early.

To all those questions, here's the resounding answer from a Chargers executive in-the-know. Any thoughts of the Chargers setting up shop again in their old stomping grounds are all wet.

"We have a better chance of playing in the swimming pool in the backyard at my house than we do in returning to San Diego,'' said Fred Maas, the Chargers' chief of staff who oversees day-to-day business functions for the organization.

Maas once worked for San Diego Centre City Development Corporation which orchestrated the redevelopment of the downtown region. In 2016, he joined the Chargers to spearhead negotiations with the city to strike a deal to keep the squad in San Diego.

He's had a seat at the table when the Chargers were looking at a downtown San Diego site, or one in Mission Valley or any of the other roughly 12 locales in San Diego County. They were the places that all looked spiffy in splashy artist renderings, but weren't worth the paper they were printed on.

"I said back in 2016 that the worst deal in Los Angeles is better than the best deal in San Diego,'' Maas said, not mincing any words. "That statement, that fact, is still true today.''

Sunday was another day in which the Chargers backers were outmatched in the stands, with jerseys of Bart Starr, Aaron Rodgers, Clay Matthews and even Paul Hornung eclipsing the gear that honored Chargers players, past and present.

Maybe that was because tickets were going for about $400 on the secondary market. Chargers season-ticket holders cashed in on the thousands of Packers boosters living in the land of sun balm instead of bratwurst.

The Chargers faithful were heard. But it couldn’t quite match the "Go Pack Go" chant that reverberated around Dignity Health Sports Park, with the colors of yellow and green evident.

But the green that really counts is the potential cash headed to the Chargers in their long-term investment bet by moving. In that regard, Maas said the Chargers have "hit a home run.''

"We went from a market in San Diego with four million people to a market that has 13-15 million people,'' he said. "And of that figure, four million are football fans. So I don't think how many visiting fans are at our games should be a measuring stick.''

Instead the Chargers point to a data base that they've accumulated of nearly 800,000 L.A. area football followers. They mention selling out their season tickets, albeit in a facility which seats about 27,000, in all three of their seasons. They mention the nearly 20,000 people clogging the Santa Monica Pier for last spring's draft party.

Have there been missteps along the way? Maas doesn't discount that. But he couldn't stress any clearer that if San Diego gets another NFL team, while that would be swell, it won't be the Chargers.

"This is not a sprint, it's a marathon,'' Maas said of the Chargers planting their flag in the crowded L.A. sports landscape. "We knew we couldn't parachute into L.A. and have the fans immediately fall in love with you.

"It takes time for them to get to know us, know our players and for us to become familiar faces in the community. I think that is the perspective you have to have.''

So even if the visuals aren't money, the Chargers' decision to flee San Diego is.

"We didn't leave San Diego,'' Maas said. "We got kicked out.''

One Chargers fan is happy they're some 100 miles north.

"I love it that they are here,'' said Burbank's Sean Perez, a Chargers season-ticket holder since 2005. "For an NFL experience, you can't beat this.''

Perez won't bang the drum that the team should be back in San Diego.

"San Diego fans didn't want to pay the money, just like St. Louis fans didn't want to,'' he said. "And if that happens that usually means someone else will.''

And if Perez is elbowed by fans wearing the opposing teams' colors, so be it.

"It's L.A.,'' he said. "Everyone wants to be here and everyone is from somewhere else: Wisconsin, Colorado, just go down the line.''

Perez's buddy from Long Beach couldn't disagree more. Juan Nodal grew up in San Diego and was once a ball boy who ran out of the stadium tunnel with Dan Fouts.

"My preference is that they were still in San Diego because that is where they need to be,'' he said. "I think at some point the NFL is going to force (Spanos) to sell the team and go back.''

They are reports that the Chargers have sold just $100 million in personal seat licenses for season tickets in the new SoFi Stadium. It was once speculated that they would contribute $400 million in sales.

"It's going to be embarrassing for the NFL to have parts of the new stadium tarped off,'' Nodal said.

But Maas wouldn't concede that advance sales aren't up to snuff, while declining to reveal hard numbers of how many season tickets the team has sold for next year.

If nothing else, the Chargers ducats are significantly more affordable than the ones being peddled by the Rams.

So while the Chargers struggle to currently get their fans in the building, their doors will remain open in L.A. They'll move into a $5 billion venue next year with the Rams, which Maas expects to nudge the needle in his team's direction.

"It's going to be enormous,'' he said. "It will be a signature for us and greater Los Angeles. You can't really fathom what it is going be. It's a building the likes of which no one has ever seen.

"People are going to look back five years from now and say Dean was the smartest owner in the NFL to move into this stadium with the favorable economic conditions that give us the running room to do other things.''

It’s believed the Chargers have a 20-year lease at $1 per year, plus four five-year options to extend the agreement.

Those terms are among the factors to prevent the Chargers from skedaddling back to San Diego.

There's also little reason, in their eyes, to be in the nation's No. 28 media market instead of one ranked No. 2, or gallop to a city without a stadium from one where an NFL palace is rising where Hollywood Park once stood.

They’re also obligated to pay a $650 million relocation fee to the other NFL owners and they have borrowed $200 million from the NFL G4 loan program.

The Chargers, whose value increased 11 percent to $2.5 billion in the last year according to Forbes, are also slated to receive a 18.75 percent cut from the reported $30 million annual payment from a 20-year deal for the naming rights sold to Social Finance.

Plus they’re partners in attractive sponsorship deals cemented with American Airlines and Pepsi to lessen the Chargers’ motivation to chuck it all away and come back to San Diego.

Rome wasn't built in a day and the same holds true for accumulating a legion of Chargers fans in L.A.

Still....

"It's clear we made the right decision,'' Maas said. "It might not be moving as fast as we want but we are on track.''

What’s as clear as the Chargers’ stout defense in shutting down Rodgers is that on the team's long road to respectability in the entertainment capital of the world, there's one thought they're not entertaining: returning to San Diego.

"It's not happening by any stretch of the imagination,'' Maas said. "There is no opportunity out there that would make that happen.''
What a load of bullshit. Maas is a lying sack of shit, “12 viable offers that looked spiffy on paper”, we all know every single one of those, not counting downtown and Mission Valley, were all in the preliminary stages, nobody sat down and presented anything because Spenis opted to pursue it no further than maybe visiting the site.

Who are you going to believe? A guy who’s job it is to cover Dean’s fat ass, or a reporter (Plaschke) who has a good reputation and has a pulse on the sports scene in LA?
 
  • Like
Reactions: SDRay

Lance19

BoltTalker
Oct 2, 2011
6,590
1,074
340
Wherever these Valkyries drop me...
LA Chargers’ Chances of Moving Back To San Diego: Slim And None


Confirms that Dean's Measure C was BS and that he had no intention doing a deal in SD.

One Los Angeles Chargers fan threw up his hands and stated the obvious.

"I'm surrounded by cheese!'' he said.

That he was with the Green Bay Packers in town. That meant thousands of their loyal Cheeseheads were in full throat on Sunday as the Chargers beat the Packers, 26-11.

Chargers backers, again, were outnumbered at a home game in a scene that has been repeated since the team returned to L.A.

Something else that's predictable: the national stories about what a disaster the relocation from San Diego to L.A. has been for the Chargers.

Or how the NFL will force the Spanos family to liquidate the team and return to America's Finest City. Or how owner Dean Spanos committed a huge business blunder by leaving his reliable patrons of nearly six decades for the fickle fans of L.A., the ones that arrive late and exit early.

To all those questions, here's the resounding answer from a Chargers executive in-the-know. Any thoughts of the Chargers setting up shop again in their old stomping grounds are all wet.

"We have a better chance of playing in the swimming pool in the backyard at my house than we do in returning to San Diego,'' said Fred Maas, the Chargers' chief of staff who oversees day-to-day business functions for the organization.

Maas once worked for San Diego Centre City Development Corporation which orchestrated the redevelopment of the downtown region. In 2016, he joined the Chargers to spearhead negotiations with the city to strike a deal to keep the squad in San Diego.

He's had a seat at the table when the Chargers were looking at a downtown San Diego site, or one in Mission Valley or any of the other roughly 12 locales in San Diego County. They were the places that all looked spiffy in splashy artist renderings, but weren't worth the paper they were printed on.

"I said back in 2016 that the worst deal in Los Angeles is better than the best deal in San Diego,'' Maas said, not mincing any words. "That statement, that fact, is still true today.''

Sunday was another day in which the Chargers backers were outmatched in the stands, with jerseys of Bart Starr, Aaron Rodgers, Clay Matthews and even Paul Hornung eclipsing the gear that honored Chargers players, past and present.

Maybe that was because tickets were going for about $400 on the secondary market. Chargers season-ticket holders cashed in on the thousands of Packers boosters living in the land of sun balm instead of bratwurst.

The Chargers faithful were heard. But it couldn’t quite match the "Go Pack Go" chant that reverberated around Dignity Health Sports Park, with the colors of yellow and green evident.

But the green that really counts is the potential cash headed to the Chargers in their long-term investment bet by moving. In that regard, Maas said the Chargers have "hit a home run.''

"We went from a market in San Diego with four million people to a market that has 13-15 million people,'' he said. "And of that figure, four million are football fans. So I don't think how many visiting fans are at our games should be a measuring stick.''

Instead the Chargers point to a data base that they've accumulated of nearly 800,000 L.A. area football followers. They mention selling out their season tickets, albeit in a facility which seats about 27,000, in all three of their seasons. They mention the nearly 20,000 people clogging the Santa Monica Pier for last spring's draft party.

Have there been missteps along the way? Maas doesn't discount that. But he couldn't stress any clearer that if San Diego gets another NFL team, while that would be swell, it won't be the Chargers.

"This is not a sprint, it's a marathon,'' Maas said of the Chargers planting their flag in the crowded L.A. sports landscape. "We knew we couldn't parachute into L.A. and have the fans immediately fall in love with you.

"It takes time for them to get to know us, know our players and for us to become familiar faces in the community. I think that is the perspective you have to have.''

So even if the visuals aren't money, the Chargers' decision to flee San Diego is.

"We didn't leave San Diego,'' Maas said. "We got kicked out.''

One Chargers fan is happy they're some 100 miles north.

"I love it that they are here,'' said Burbank's Sean Perez, a Chargers season-ticket holder since 2005. "For an NFL experience, you can't beat this.''

Perez won't bang the drum that the team should be back in San Diego.

"San Diego fans didn't want to pay the money, just like St. Louis fans didn't want to,'' he said. "And if that happens that usually means someone else will.''

And if Perez is elbowed by fans wearing the opposing teams' colors, so be it.

"It's L.A.,'' he said. "Everyone wants to be here and everyone is from somewhere else: Wisconsin, Colorado, just go down the line.''

Perez's buddy from Long Beach couldn't disagree more. Juan Nodal grew up in San Diego and was once a ball boy who ran out of the stadium tunnel with Dan Fouts.

"My preference is that they were still in San Diego because that is where they need to be,'' he said. "I think at some point the NFL is going to force (Spanos) to sell the team and go back.''

They are reports that the Chargers have sold just $100 million in personal seat licenses for season tickets in the new SoFi Stadium. It was once speculated that they would contribute $400 million in sales.

"It's going to be embarrassing for the NFL to have parts of the new stadium tarped off,'' Nodal said.

But Maas wouldn't concede that advance sales aren't up to snuff, while declining to reveal hard numbers of how many season tickets the team has sold for next year.

If nothing else, the Chargers ducats are significantly more affordable than the ones being peddled by the Rams.

So while the Chargers struggle to currently get their fans in the building, their doors will remain open in L.A. They'll move into a $5 billion venue next year with the Rams, which Maas expects to nudge the needle in his team's direction.

"It's going to be enormous,'' he said. "It will be a signature for us and greater Los Angeles. You can't really fathom what it is going be. It's a building the likes of which no one has ever seen.

"People are going to look back five years from now and say Dean was the smartest owner in the NFL to move into this stadium with the favorable economic conditions that give us the running room to do other things.''

It’s believed the Chargers have a 20-year lease at $1 per year, plus four five-year options to extend the agreement.

Those terms are among the factors to prevent the Chargers from skedaddling back to San Diego.

There's also little reason, in their eyes, to be in the nation's No. 28 media market instead of one ranked No. 2, or gallop to a city without a stadium from one where an NFL palace is rising where Hollywood Park once stood.

They’re also obligated to pay a $650 million relocation fee to the other NFL owners and they have borrowed $200 million from the NFL G4 loan program.

The Chargers, whose value increased 11 percent to $2.5 billion in the last year according to Forbes, are also slated to receive a 18.75 percent cut from the reported $30 million annual payment from a 20-year deal for the naming rights sold to Social Finance.

Plus they’re partners in attractive sponsorship deals cemented with American Airlines and Pepsi to lessen the Chargers’ motivation to chuck it all away and come back to San Diego.

Rome wasn't built in a day and the same holds true for accumulating a legion of Chargers fans in L.A.

Still....

"It's clear we made the right decision,'' Maas said. "It might not be moving as fast as we want but we are on track.''

What’s as clear as the Chargers’ stout defense in shutting down Rodgers is that on the team's long road to respectability in the entertainment capital of the world, there's one thought they're not entertaining: returning to San Diego.

"It's not happening by any stretch of the imagination,'' Maas said. "There is no opportunity out there that would make that happen.''
Uh...yeah...Maas has "presidential level" credibility.

About the only thing that rang true from that was Paris' higher level mathematical computation:
"One Chargers fan is happy they're some 100 miles north."
 

SDRay

#GoIrish #Aztecs #SDGulls #Raiders #THFC #RipCity
Staff member
Administrator
Podcaster
Jun 20, 2005
13,597
1,943
350
47
Chula Vista, CA
www.afsportsforum.com
Column: Chargers’ big win shows why they deserve to play where they’ll be appreciated


The punchline punched back.
The interlopers owned the joint.
On a bodacious yet bittersweet Sunday, the Chargers showed they belong somewhere, anywhere.
But just not here.
In a dominant 26-11 victory over the mighty Green Bay Packers at Dignity Health Sports Park, the Chargers proved they are not some running joke, but an actual contending-caliber football team that deserves to play in a place that appreciates them.
But that place is not Los Angeles.
It was a nationally televised wonder for the Chargers and a shame for the NFL, the football world witnessing Sunday’s most brilliant home-field performance coming from a team without a home.
The Chargers used a bruising running game and nearly perfect Philip Rivers’ passing to outgain the previously-one-loss Packers, 442-184.
Yet a crowd that was almost completely Cheesehead rocked the stadium with chants of, “Go Pack Go!”
A Chargers defense led by the fast and furious Melvin Ingram and Joey Bosa held the great Aaron Rodgers to 61 yards passing through three quarters.
Yet the Green Bay faithful were so overwhelming, at one point Packer linebacker Za’Darius Smith lifted his hands to exhort the crowd to cheer, and when is the last time you’ve seen a visiting player do that anywhere but here?
When the Chargers scored their first touchdown late in the third quarter, they actually silenced most of the crowd, and when is the last time you’ve seen a home team do that anywhere but here?
Anywhere but here. For the sake of the team, for the sake of the league, that is where the Chargers need to eventually be.
They’ve endured three seasons of this nonsense, their failure to capture a Los Angeles audience resulting in nearly every home game feeling like a road game, their stadium overrun with folks from Green Bay and Pittsburgh and Philadelphia and Denver and, of course, Oakland.
“Felt like an away game, every week, it is what it is at this point,” said Charger receiver Keenan Allen after departing the sea of green and gold. ”Yeah, just to shut those guys up, we come together as a team, 16 road games, that’s what we do … we know what it is.”


1/15

Chargers running back Melvin Gordon leaps into the end zone to score a touchdown during the third quarter against the Green Bay Packers. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)


2/15

Chargers defensive end Joey Bosa sacks Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)


3/15

Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers flips the ball to running back Melvin Gordon to keep a second quarter scoring drive alive against the Packers. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

4/15

Chargers defensive end Melvin Ingram sacks Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

5/15

Chargers tight end Hunter Henry catches pass in front of Green Bay Packers defensive back Darnell Savage in the first quarter. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

6/15

CARSON, CA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2019 - Los Angeles Chargers running back Melvin Gordon (25) leaps over Green Bay Packers defensive back Chandon Sullivan (39) during a third quarter run at Dignity Health Sports Park. (Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times) (Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times)

7/15

Chargers kicker Mike Badgley connects on a 43-yard field goal against the Packers. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

8/15

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers scrambles past Chargers defensive tackle Jerry Tillery during a successful two-point conversion attempt during the fourth quarter. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

9/15

Green Bay Packers wide receiver Jake Kumerow can’t catch a long pass from quarterback Aaron Rodgers in front of Chargers defensive back Jaylen Watkins during the second half. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

10/15

Chargers running back Melvin Gordon celebrates after scoring a touchdown in the fourth quarter against the Green Bay Packers. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

11/15

Packers fans fill the seats at Dignity Health Sports Park during the Chargers’ win on Sunday. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

12/15

Chargers linebacker Drue Tranquill blocks a punt by the Packers’ J.K. Scott during the third quarter. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

13/15

Chargers wide receiver Mike Williams is shoved out of bounds by Green Bay Packers strong safety Adrian Amos after making a catch. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

14/15

Chargers defensive end Joey Bosa pressures Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers late in the game. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

15/15

Chargers running back Melvin Gordon, right, and fullback Derek Watt hug after a touchdown against the Green Bay Packers. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
It’s a terrible look for the league, and embarrassing look for the city, and a completely unfair situation for the players, especially on special afternoons like Sunday, when they deserved three hours of standing ovations. Instead, they had to settle for one prolonged, “Let’s Go Chargers’’’ cheer that arose in the final minutes from a relatively small group collected in the corner of an end zone.
Bless those fans. They are the definition of diehards. The problem is, there are just not enough of them, and it affects the way this organization is perceived, both inside and out.
In this season’s earlier home loss to the Steelers, the players let the home hostility bother them. At least one Charger said they succeeded Sunday partly because they overcame that annoyance.
“We’ve talked to ourselves about bringing the energy ourselves, not allowing the crowd to affect us, and not needing the crowd to get going,” said Drue Tranquill, the rookie linebacker who didn’t have to deal with this sort of thing at Notre Dame. “I thought we did a way better job this afternoon than we did in the Pittsburgh game of really motivating ourselves … we talked about, we have all we need.”
It was Tranquill’s punt block that led to Melvin Gordon’s one-yard touchdown run to give the Chargers a 19-0 lead late in the third quarter. On both the block and the run, Tranquill and Gordon celebrated with teammates amid an eerie calm. It was so odd, seeing Rivers dancing by himself to a soundtrack of mostly murmurs.
“Us against the world? Pretty much, yeah,” said Gordon.
On the other side, Rodgers said the visiting crowd was so loud, it might have actually made the Packers complacent.
“The focus was off,’’ Rodgers said, later adding, “I don’t know if it was the fact that we had an incredible Green Bay crowd today or the fact looking too much at what their record was (3-5), but it wasn’t a great performance.”
There are only two regular-season games left at cozy Dignity Health Sports Park, where the small size amplifies the impact of the visiting fans. The Chargers hope the atmosphere will change when they move into giant new SoFi Stadium next year, a place with more space and cheaper tickets.
Ah, but even the grandest football palace will not attract more Charger fans as long as it contains, well, the Chargers. Moving 13 miles north is not going to change the fact that most Southern Californians thought the Chargers never should have moved from San Diego in the first place.
Unlike the Rams, whose arrival here was sold as a homecoming, the Chargers showed up as home wreckers, and despite their best efforts, they’ve been unable to change that narrative. They’ve lost most of their San Diego fans, they grossly overestimated their number of Los Angeles fans, and now they are truly a team without a cheering section.
Some folks initially said, if they win, it will work. Well, it hasn’t.
Last season they won a playoff game and were just 60 minutes from reaching the AFC championship game when they were knocked out by the eventual champion New England Patriots. Yet the buzz didn’t make it to Monday morning.
Other folks said, if they offer a great fan experience, it will work. Well, they have, and it hasn’t.
For sheer proximity to the action, there is no better place to witness a professional football game in this country than Dignity Health Sports Park. You are so close to the field, it’s like watching a Broadway play while standing in the wings. For three years, visitors have marveled at the intimacy, the accessibility and the cleanliness of the place. Yet, as Sunday once again proved, few Chargers fans show up.
There is a belief in some parts that when hosting rabid fan bases such as the Packers’, Charger fans can’t resist selling their seats at high prices. Whatever the reason, the stadium consistently looks as if it doesn’t belong in Los Angeles, and neither does the team.
“The whole stadium is green; they feel like they can come in here and take it over,’’ Allen said. “I promise you, it’s not that sweet.”
It was decidedly sour for the Packers against an inspired Chargers team — “For whatever reason, we do better when the Chargers don’t have a chance,” said Rivers — but the bitter taste remains with a league that needs to do something about these bolt-bearing nomads.
Here’s guessing NFL owners will give the Chargers a couple of years in SoFi Stadium to find their fans. If they don’t, and at this point there’s no reason to believe they will, here’s guessing the league will push the Spanos family to either move the team or sell it. They could ship it to London. They could drive it to the Bay Area. They could sell it to someone in — woo-hoo! — San Diego.
Anywhere but here.
 

Harryo the K

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2017
5,113
930
300
69
Here’s guessing NFL owners will give the Chargers a couple of years in SoFi Stadium to find their fans. If they don’t, and at this point there’s no reason to believe they will, here’s guessing the league will push the Spanos family to either move the team or sell it. They could ship it to London. They could drive it to the Bay Area. They could sell it to someone in — woo-hoo! — San Diego.
Anywhere but here.
———————————-
1.:LA has no interest or loyalty to/with the Chargers.
2. LA fans like the Raiders and some like the Rams.
3. LA may be 'fickled fans' but they know Spanni loyalty is a cloud of smoke. That's
Why SD fans hate that team so much and why the LA fans know they never will fall for the
Spanni spin. Not as long as the Raiders exist. It's a matter of time/years until Spanni 'demands' a new stadium
from their 'New fan base' or they head to....Sacramento?

LA fans have no desire to get into that hospital bed with the Spanni. Ever. Ever.
 

Quetzalcoatl

BoltTalker
Feb 1, 2015
6,075
764
330
L.A. fans like the Cowboys, Steelers, Raiders, and whoever the front runner of the moment is. I could be wrong, so please feel free to correct me on this next point. I believe the NFL had higher T.V. ratings in L.A. before the St. Louis Kronkies and the San Diego Spanoses moved there.
 

Gill Man

Inaugural San Diego Charger Fan Since 1962 FUDEAN
Staff member
Moderator
Sep 1, 2017
7,867
1,516
320
L.A. fans like the Cowboys, Steelers, Raiders, and whoever the front runner of the moment is. I could be wrong, so please feel free to correct me on this next point. I believe the NFL had higher T.V. ratings in L.A. before the St. Louis Kronkies and the San Diego Spanoses moved there.
Not sure either but I think I heard something along those lines......in other words prior to the 2 current 'teams' there, LA sportfans got to see the prime games in the am and pm. Now they are stuck with at least one , and for some two, games they mostly care less about every Sunday morning or afternoon. So therefore ratings overall are down. LA fans mostly love the Raiders overall. Rams probably second for now and they never will like the chuggers much.....since they love the Raiders they have a natural hate for the chuggers. And it's made even worse because many football purists feel dean spanos is a weanie for taking the bolts from the home they belong in and bringing them to LA to rent and block the Raiders from any chance at coming back to their LA home. And you are right there are many transplants in LA who love the Cowboys and Steelers and Packers etc etc. Mixed bag up there. San Diego was similar as to transplants but if the bolts were ever in contention like they were last year....this city would go bonkers and the place would be rockin' chuggers all night long. Not in LA though. They are an afterthought.....or maybe afterbirth is more appropriate lolz.
 

SDRay

#GoIrish #Aztecs #SDGulls #Raiders #THFC #RipCity
Staff member
Administrator
Podcaster
Jun 20, 2005
13,597
1,943
350
47
Chula Vista, CA
www.afsportsforum.com
Another good one.

Opinion: Chargers are never going to make it in Los Angeles

The Chargers and the NFL have backed themselves into a corner of their own design.

The league allowed the Chargers to destroy their home in San Diego, certain there would be a market for the team in Los Angeles despite all warnings to the contrary. Sure enough, it’s three years later and the only market where the Chargers are thriving is the secondary one.

Their temporary home only seats 30,000, yet it is repeatedly overrun by opponents’ fans. Sales of personal seat licenses for the swanky, soon-to-open SoFi Stadium are reportedly feeble. With almost no history in Los Angeles, the Chargers have not been able to get a foothold in a town where interest in the NFL has never been particularly strong.

Chargers fans are often surrounded by empty seats at home, or by fans of the opposing team.

Now come rumblings, via a report Monday in The Athletic, that the NFL is concerned enough about the Chargers’ long-term viability in Los Angeles that it is at least exploring the option of making the team its first full-time franchise in London.

“It’s total (expletive) bullshit,” Chargers owner Dean Spanos said Tuesday. “We’re not going to London. We’re not going anywhere. We’re playing in Los Angeles. This is our home, and this is where we are planning to be for a long (expletive) time. Period.”

The NFL wasn't quite so, umm, colorful, but no less definitive.

"No consideration has been given to the Chargers playing anywhere other than Los Angeles ... next season and beyond," the league said in a statement. "Both our office and the Chargers are entirely focused on the success of the team in Los Angeles."

Uh-huh. The success of the NFL's London games means some team is moving there, likely sooner rather than later, and right now the Chargers and the Jacksonville Jaguars are the most obvious candidates. Let’s see what happens after a season or two of the Chargers dragging down the NFL’s attendance numbers, or only being able to sell out their games at SoFi Stadium with the help of their out-of-town friends.

In the meantime, forgive me if I have zero sympathy for and am actually enjoying the predicament in which the NFL and Chargers find themselves.

The Chargers abandoned San Diego, their home of more than a half-century, for no other reason than greed. The loyalty of the fans, the impact the departure would have on a smaller-market city, the jobs that were lost – Spanos didn’t care about any of that. He wanted a new stadium but didn’t want to pay for it, and when San Diego called his bluff, he picked up his ball and went to a new city.

That Spanos then accepted the NFL’s $650 million relocation fee without batting an eye is some next-level hypocrisy. But I digress …

The Chargers were always going to be a bad fit in Los Angeles, and just about everyone could see that. Los Angeles is all about glitz and glamour, but it has never been a big sports city. Not in the traditional sense, anyway. It loves its Lakers and its Dodgers and its USC football and UCLA basketball, but that has as much to do with the titles the teams have won and the stars who have played for them as anything else.

The Clippers, another San Diego transplant, have been in Los Angeles for how long now? And it’s taken a super team and a hyperactive and quirky owner who can spawn a new meme at any moment to make them semi-relevant in their own town.

Los Angeles’ history with the NFL was not exactly heartening, either. It had lured and lost two teams, the Rams and the Raiders, and didn’t seem to mind being without an NFL team for 20-some years after they left. Didn’t really seem to notice, if we’re being truthful.

To foist two teams on a city ambivalent about the NFL and think both would thrive was either arrogant or ignorant or a little bit of both.

At least the Rams had a history in Los Angeles, along with a small fan base that stayed loyal while the team was in St. Louis. The Chargers had … nothing.

Plus, those in Los Angeles who cared about the NFL already had their allegiances, whether it was still to the Rams or Raiders, or some other team. There was no room for the Chargers, and no want to create any for them, either.

The NFL and the Chargers seem to think all of this will change when the team moves into SoFi Stadium, which it will share with the Rams. That the people of Los Angeles will be so dazzled by the new digs that they will embrace the Chargers and forget about the ugliness in San Diego.

But the Chargers need more than a change of address – if that address is still in Southern California, that is – and the NFL needs to be realistic about the market in Los Angeles. Allowing the Chargers to move to Los Angeles was a bad idea, one that looks worse with every game they play there.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gill Man

Harryo the K

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2017
5,113
930
300
69
And in case you wonder why--forever—the Chuggers remain the Chuggers....

 
  • Haha
Reactions: Gill Man